chrysotile : List Of Minerals : The Stone Network
The Business To Business Portal For The Natural Stone Trade

Premium Black Galaxy Granite Slabs
Direct From The Factory
Ex-India



Stone Fairs

Exhibitions 2017 Country
Exhibitions 2017 By Date

Stone Images

Granite
Limestone
Marble
Onyx
Quartzite
Sandstone
Slate
Travertine

Stone Machines

New Stone Machines
Used Stone Machines

Stone Sites

Stone Forums
Stone Magazines
Stone Portals

Stone Standards

CE Marking

Stone Supplies & Fabricators

Australia
Canada
United Kingdom
U.S.A.

Stone Testing

6 Companies

Petrology

Granite
Limestone
Marble
Quartzite
Sandstone
Slate
Travertine

Rocks

Igneous
List of Minerals
List of Rocks
Metamorphic
Minerals
Sedimentary

Various Resources

A To Z Stone Names
Anti Slip
BIDA
Building Conservation
Building Design
English Heritage
Maintenance Products
Natural Stone Database
RIBA
RICS
Salvo
SPAB
Stone Federation GB
Trade Terminology

Chrysotile is an asbestiform sub-group within the serpentine group of minerals. There are three known species of chrysotile: clinochrysotile (which is monoclinic), orthochrysotile (which is orthorhombic) and parachrysotile (which is also an orthorhombic polymorph). These varieties are all phyllosilicates. The chemical formulae for the three are the same: Mg3(Si2O5)(OH)4 with variable iron as Fe2+ substituting for magnesium. Chrysotile varies in color from gray-white to golden yellow to green. It has a hardness of 2.5 - 3. The three varieties form the fibrous members of the serpentine group and have been extensively mined as asbestos.

Clinochrysotile is the monoclinic form of chrysotile and likely the most common variety. Like the other two species of chrysotile (orthochrysotile and parachrysotile) it is very difficult to distinguish from the other species. Its type location is unknown although the chrysotile from Asbestos, Quebec, Canada is largely clinochrysotile.

Orthochrysotile is the orthorhombic form of chrysotile and is more common than the other orthorhombic form parachrysotile. Like the other two species of chrysotile (clinochrysotile and parachrysotile) it is very difficult to distinguish from the other species. Its type location is found in Silesia.

Parachrysotile is a second orthorhombic form of chrysotile. Like the other two species of chrysotile (orthochrysotile and clinochrysotile) it is very difficult to distinguish from the other species. Its type location is Québec, Canada.

Chrysotile, a form of asbestos, is a proven human carcinogen (List of IARC Group 1 carcinogens). It is known contributor to mesothelioma. However, unlike other asbestos forms of asbestos such as crocidolite and amosite, Chrysotile only poses a risk when absorbed in extreme quantities. This is due to the fact that Chrysotile is a rolled phyllosilicate, whereas other asbestoform minerals are bladed amphiboles. These blades become imbeded in lung tissue upon inhalation, and serve as a constant irritant until the tissue becomes cancerous. Chrysotile is much more flexible than amphibole asbestos, and does not cause cancer in the same manner. Instead, the risk posed by Chrysotile in large quantities is similar to silicosis caused by inhalation of fine grained quartz. However, EPA and OSHA guidelines do not distiguish between phyllosilicate and amphibole asbestoses.

Trade Supplies
Information
Information
  • Absolute Black Granite : Black Galaxy, Star Galaxy, Nero Impala etc. Black is popular, black looks great, black is more expensive >>>
  • Black Galaxy Granite : Quarrying & Quality Information >>>
  • M.I.A. Information
    Copyright :
    Legal Information
    This web site is protected under International Law by the
    Digital Millennium Copyright Act 1998.

    If you wish to link to this site please feel free to do so HOWEVER blatant design copying, code copying and theft of bandwidth will result in legal action!

    Digg Logo ImageDigg Facebook Logo ImageFacebook Reddit Logo ImageReddit StumbleUpon Logo ImageStumbleUpon Twitter Logo ImageTwitter

    Home : Contact : About : Legal : Privacy : Cookies : Copyright 1998-2017 : The Stone Network