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Travertine Petrology & Sedimentary Rock Information

Travertine is a form of massive calcium carbonate, CaCO3 , resulting from deposition by springs or rivers. It is often beautifully coloured and banded as a result of the presence of iron compounds or other (e.g., organic) impurities. This material is variously known as calc-sinter and calcareous tufa (when used for decorative purposes), in fact Travertine is actually a dense closely compacted form of limestone.

Travertine is an excellent product for residential and commercial use and is becoming increasingly popular because not only does it have the elegant look of marble, but also once sealed Travertine tiles require very little maintenance, which allows for a timeless & beautiful appearance.

Travertine is available in a number of finishes ranging from polish, cross-cut, regular-cut, honed & filled, honed & unfilled, tumbled, distressed-edge, patinato and unpolished to name a few.

Travertine tile possess a wide range of colors, and cover the spectrum from pure white to deep mahogany. The various hues of Travertine tile can sometimes be constant throughout large pieces and at times are blended. Travertine tile displays distinct veins at times and is a very sturdy natural stone.

Onyx marble, Mexican onyx, and Egyptian or Oriental alabaster are terms applied to travertine. Travertine is generally less coarse-grained and takes a higher polish than stalactite and stalagmite, which are similar in chemical composition and origin.

SEDIMENTARY ROCKS GENERAL

Sedimentary rock is one of the three main rock groups (along with igneous and metamorphic rocks) and is formed in three main ways-by the deposition of the weathered remains of other rocks (known as clastic sedimentary rocks); by the deposition of the results of biogenic activity; and by precipitation from solution. Sedimentary rocks include common types such as chalk, limestone, sandstone, and shale.

Sedimentary rocks are formed from overburden pressure as particles of sediment are deposited out of air, ice, or water flows carrying the particles in suspension. As sediment deposition builds up, the overburden (or lithostatic) pressure squeezes the sediment into layered solids in a process known as lithification ("rock formation") and the original connate fluids are expelled.

Sedimentary rocks are composed largely of silica (i.e. quartz), with other common minerals including feldspars, amphiboles, clay minerals and sometimes more exotic igneous minerals. Sedimentary rocks are classified as clastic, that is, they are composed of discrete clasts of material (rather than being composed of organic material as is the case for a limestone).

Carbonate minerals precipitating out of the ocean cover the ocean floor with layers of calcite which can later form limestone.

Sedimentary rocks are economically important in that they can be used as construction material. In addition, sedimentary rocks often form porous and permeable reservoirs in sedimentary basins in which petroleum and other hydrocarbons can be found.

It is believed that the relatively low levels of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere, in comparison to that of Venus, is due to large amounts of carbon being trapped in limestone and dolomite sedimentary layers. The flux of carbon from eroded sediments to marine deposits is known as the carbon-cycle.

The shape of the particles in sedimentary rocks has an important effect on the ability of micro-organisms to colonize them. This interaction is studied in the science of geomicrobiology. One measure of the shape of these particles is the roundness factor, also known as the Krumbein number after the geologist W. C. Krumbein.

Sedimentary rock is one of the three main rock groups. See also igneous and metamorphic.

Sedimentary rock is formed from the weathered remains of other rocks.

CLASSIFICATION OF ROCKS

Rocks Classification Image


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